Jeanie Johnston Famine Ship Museum

Day Out
Custom House Quay, Dublin, Ireland
Adult - EUR 9.50 Child - EUR 5.00 Family - EUR 20.00
Suitable for:
Facilities:

Description

THE JEANIE JOHNSTON IS CURRENTLY CLOSED TO FACILITATE PLANNED MAINTENANCE

We expect to open again at the beginning of December 2016.

Visit the Jeanie Johnston Tall Ship and See How Irish Emigrants made the Passage to America.

A guided tour of the Jeanie Johnston will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the experiences of Irish emigrants as they made a daunting transatlantic passage full of hope yet desperate to escape the hardship in Ireland during the Famine years

The Ship is Docked at Custom House Quay in Dublin’s city centre. 50 minute tours run throughout the day and offer a memorable experience to all.

Step Aboard the Jeanie Johnston and get a sense of the experience of the millions of people who crossed the Atlantic in tall ships, seeking survival and hope in the “New World”.

The original Jeanie Johnston made 16 emigrant journeys to North America between 1847 and 1855, carrying over 2,500 people with no loss of life.

The ship is an authentic replica, built in Tralee, Co. Kerry. It has  sailed to North America, and to various points in Europe.

The tour of this beautiful ship is one of Dublin’s most popular attractions.

Once on board, visitors are transported back in time to join the poverty stricken Irish emigrants in the 1850s as they boarded the sturdy ship for the difficult transatlantic voyage and uncertain future in the ‘New World’

Below Deck

The dimly-lit quarters below deck show vividly what it was like for those passengers. The life-sized figures presented are all based on actual passengers who sailed on the ship. From the 15 year old girl (Margaret Conway) travelling only with her 12 year old brother, to the father of 11 (James Stack) whose livelihood was ruined by the famine….hear the inspiring stories of human determination to overcome adversity and make a better life.

Craftsmanship

Back up on deck, visitors have an opportunity to marvel at the skill, ingenuity and craftwork involved in re-creating this genuine replica of a wooden tall ship, one of the last of its type to sail the Atlantic in the 19th Century.

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