National Print Museum

Day Out
Old Garrison Chapel, Beggars Bush Barracks, Haddington Road, Dublin 4, Ireland
Monday - Friday: 09.00 - 17.00 | Saturday - Sunday: 14.00 - 17.00 Closed bank holiday weekends
Adult - EUR 3.50
Suitable for:
Facilities:

Description

The National Print Museum collects, documents, preserves, exhibits, interprets and makes accessible the material evidence of printing craft and fosters associated skills of the craft in Ireland.

On the ground floor, visitors will find the Reception, Museum Shop, permanent exhibition, toilets, and Café. The ground floor is fully accessible. Entry for wheelchairs, prams and buggies is via the Café.

On the mezzanine level, visitors will find the Education Area, lecture and workshop spaces, and temporary exhibitions. The mezzanine level is not accessible to wheelchair users. 

History

With the advancement in new technologies in the 1980s, letterpress printing was being made redundant. A group of like-minded printers and typesetters, spear-headed by former compositor and union official Mr Sean Galavan, fortunately had the foresight to start collecting printing equipment.

In 1990 space was acquired at union offices on Gardiner Street in Dublin’s city centre and then in 1996 the Museum was officially opened by then President, Mary Robinson, at the Old Garrison Chapel in Beggars Bush Barracks.

While traditional letterpress printing was made redundant in the commercial sense, the craft of letterpress is still very much alive. The Museum is a working museum with a panel of active retired printers and typesetters regularly maintaining and demonstrating the collection, and providing training.

In this digital age where information is at our fingertips, the National Print Museum affords the opportunity to step back in time to discover the traditional craft of letterpress printing and appreciate the importance of the invention of the printed word.

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